Escazu Agreement Peru

Duque signed it on 11 December, repugnant to his initial position that the Escazú agreement does not offer new measures and that he renounces an international review. Both houses of Congress must now approve it before facing constitutional scrutiny. The government would have been ready to introduce it on March 17 at the beginning of the new Parliament, but it was interrupted until April 13 by administrative segregation and mandatory quarantine measures. A year and a half later, the government has still not brought it before Congress. When Jimmy Morales left the presidency at the end of 2019, the Escazú agreement was theoretically still under discussion. New President Alejandro Giammattei took office in January and did not address the subject. „There are deep interests in the dispute between the environment, indigenous peoples and the private sector,“ said a human rights defender who wished to remain anonymous. „When the agreement enters into force and is implemented, countries will be better able to preserve their strategic natural heritage by increasing inclusion and community orientation. The UN Working Group on Economic Affairs and Human Rights recently congratulated Peru for its leadership in the six years of negotiations that culminated in the agreement in March 2018. Peru signed it in September 2018 and the agreement is now subject to ratification by the Peruvian Congress. If Peru ratifies, it is enough for another country to ratify for the agreement to enter into force.

Nayib Bukele`s government is still reluctant to sign the agreement and does not even talk about it publicly. „El Salvador is living in conditions of increasing environmental degradation and accelerating the effects of climate change and is, after Haiti, the second most disadvantaged and ecological country on the continent [in terms of percentage of forest cover lost],“ a dozen environmental and social organizations wrote to him last November, asking him to sign. It is now up to governments to ratify the agreement so that the document signed in Costa Rica can be translated into concrete measures to defend environmental rights. „This is a historic moment for Latin America and the Caribbean,“ said Carole Excell, director of the World Resources Institute`s (WRI) Office of Environmental Democracy. „Countries in the region have the opportunity to endorse a legally binding environmental agreement that will not only help prevent and punish attacks on environmentalists, but also facilitate access to environmental information and decisions about their lives for millions of people.“ The agreement process began six years ago, Excell Mongabay said in an interview. . . .